Books and Affiliated, From Writing to Publishing, Ponderings

“It’s Getting Harder to Wake Up.”

When you use your personal life experiences to develop a character’s struggle.


Don’t underestimate the connective power of your own story – your personal testimony. People connect to emotions. This is why teenagers (and certain moody writers) listen to sad music, angry music, heart-breaking music – because they desperately need to feel connection.

It’s no different with readers. If they’re going to pick up your story and thumb through the pages, they’re looking for a spark of connection. When they read the author section in the book aisle and inspect the summary, they’re weighing the odds of whether this will be a story worth their dime.

If you notice, the people who get the most attention and subsequently the most followers are those who exposed themselves to the world. They’re not ashamed of their struggles because they know the hardships make them strong. People gravitate toward honesty and strength.

What you must ask yourself is what do you have to offer the world? A really good story of success? Or a great testimony of survival?

This has been,

Fanny T. Crispin

Books and Affiliated

It’s Finally Here

The long-awaited sequel to Dragon King, the newest installment in the Sir Ivan’s Train series, WIZARD RING has hit the market!

Now available on Amazon and Amazon Kindle. Perfect for those quarantine blues, this story is sure to thrill!

Click here to read it!

Or if you haven’t read Dragon King yet, you can find it HERE.

And don’t forget, there are FREE short stories for your entertainment – a gift for you just being you!

~~~FanTC

Books and Affiliated, Le Shorts, Writing Prompts

In the Beginning

There was once a beautiful white snake and a great black snake in the caretaker’s garden. The black snake lay at the caretaker’s feet and enjoyed all the best he had to offer, as well as companionship and the pride of the caretaker. But for the black snake, it wasn’t enough, and he became bitter and greedy because there was one other in the garden who held the caretaker’s esteem.

Mankind.

So often, the caretaker spoke of Mankind and boasted of his achievements. It made the black snake resentful. He concocted a scheme to reduce Mankind and elevate himself once again, but something stood in his way. The black snake could go anywhere he desired as long as he did not enter the inner garden where Mankind rested. So he bequested the aid of the beautiful white snake. She guarded the coming and going of the garden and greeted the caretaker every day. One night, while he was away, she opened the gate for the black snake. He entered the inner garden and made his way to Mankind’s other half which lay sleeping beneath the trees. And so the black snake whispered in her ear to cause Mankind to fall.

#PatchworkDolls

~FanTC

Books and Affiliated, From Writing to Publishing, Writing Prompts

We’re Here!

Villains

I’ve bounced around an idea of starting a series of blogs titled “We’re Here!” – the search for characters and what makes a character-driven story.

Today, I thought we’d focus on villains. What makes a villain and what makes a good villain so bad.

In our very first post for “We’re Here!” we’ll explore villains from multiple angles and discover the antagonists all around us.


PS LOVE the new additions to the WordPress app. 😀


Bad to the Core

There are, of course, people in the world who are simply bad. They seek only to please themselves. They run after pleasures of the flesh and the physical, always chasing that which they believe will make them feel happy and fulfilled.

You can use this in a story. You can have a villain who is simply selfish, and every reader will understand their motive and cringe at the injustice of it all.

There are other levels to selfishness too. Some people have a specific skill set, such as gambling, swindling, lying, stealing, and they take pride in those skills. Give your villain a defining skill, something to make him realistic in your reader’s mind.

Bad by Default

Wouldn’t you agree some people just strike on bad luck? They were born in the wrong place at the wrong time. This can be discouraging for the human soul, which strives to believe everything it does is for good.

Now this villain needs a place to belong. They’ve given up on life and got caught up in whatever racket has been chasing them down. It could be a gang. Maybe they’re a follower for an evil ruler. Maybe they’re simply so hurt, all they care about is hurting others. Hurting people hurt people.

So give your villain a strong emotional connection on the negative side. Make them angry or bitter, resentful, unfulfilled. But try to strike for something specific – their father left them/beat them/etc. Their only friends were the neighborhood gang who treated them terrible but promised them a place to belong. Be creative, but try to stem from real-world examples if you can. Maybe they were kidnapped, human-trafficked, or simply raised by plain old mean people.

Usually these villains can have a great redemption moment. Play with that. Maybe in your story, you want to save people, not simply create an environment for your hero to be heroic. We all love stories of forgiveness.

Bad for the Sake of Good

This is a tough one. There are people in the world who believe what they do is for the good of humanity. Conquers of old were good examples of this. In those days, it was conquer or be conquered. So as ruler, you sent out to battle local countries to display your power. This in turn kept your own people safe, because no one dared challenge you.

This villain believes they are good. They are completely justified in their mind. One could almost write the story from their point of view and make them the hero!

One of the best ways to write this villain is to make them so believable even the hero begins to falter. Make your readers question everything they thought they knew about right and wrong. This is a powerful villain, because if the readers believe for even a second that their hero could fail, you’ve added the perfect element to any story – RISK.


A good way to find villains is to look at people, politicians, religious leaders, and anyone you don’t like. Dig into questions of why you don’t like them. Do they challenge your way of life? Do they cause you personal harm? Are they resisting your cause for good and well-being?

Now hop the fence and study your personal antagonists. Read up about them and their values. Discover why they do what they do. Why they believe what they believe. In doing that, you’ve just researched material for a great villain.

Now go write about them.


This has been,

Fan T. C.

in “We’re Here! – Villains”